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BRICS: a club of interests or a locomotive of the anti-Western world?

Recently, the BRICS theme has become relevant again. As of January 1, 2024, the founding countries of the international association – China, Russia, Brazil, India and South Africa – were joined by the UAE, Egypt, Ethiopia and Iran. Saudi Arabia, previously announced as a new member of BRICS, is still “considering” a proposal to join the association. Another invited country, Argentina, however, immediately responded to BRICS with an immediate rejection after new president Javier Milay, who took office, canceled his predecessor’s plans. Even during the election campaign, he made it clear that he would steer the country’s foreign policy away from China and Brazil: “Our geopolitical line is linked to the United States and Israel. We are not going to ally with the communists.” And Argentine Foreign Minister Diano Mondino said BRICS has more to do with political alignments than with the benefits the bloc could bring to trade between countries. 

Nevertheless, the trend of inviting new members continues. Developing countries are embarking on their BRICS journey in several columns – African, Middle Eastern, Asian and Latin American. This is eloquently illustrated by a series of recent high-level international meetings and visits. 

In this piece Ascolta analyzes the prospects for further expansion of BRICS, as well as the strengthening of the community’s influence on geopolitical processes and the formation of a conditional “anti-Western” bloc. 

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Recently, the BRICS theme has become relevant again. As of January 1, 2024, the founding countries of the international association – China, Russia, Brazil, India and South Africa – were joined by the UAE, Egypt, Ethiopia and Iran. Saudi Arabia, previously announced as a new member of BRICS, is still “considering” a proposal to join the association. Another invited country, Argentina, however, immediately responded to BRICS with an immediate rejection after new president Javier Milay, who took office, canceled his predecessor’s plans. Even during the election campaign, he made it clear that he would steer the country’s foreign policy away from China and Brazil: “Our geopolitical line is linked to the United States and Israel. We are not going to ally with the communists.” And Argentine Foreign Minister Diano Mondino said BRICS has more to do with political alignments than with the benefits the bloc could bring to trade between countries. 

Nevertheless, the trend of inviting new members continues. Developing countries are embarking on their BRICS journey in several columns – African, Middle Eastern, Asian and Latin American. This is eloquently illustrated by a series of recent high-level international meetings and visits. 

In this piece Ascolta analyzes the prospects for further expansion of BRICS, as well as the strengthening of the community’s influence on geopolitical processes and the formation of a conditional “anti-Western” bloc. 

This Content Is Only For Subscribers

Please subscribe to unlock this content. Enter your email to get access.
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