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Nuclear weapons in Belarus

On March 22, 2023, on the occasion of the 80th anniversary of the Khatyn tragedy, Alexander Lukashenko visited the renovated Khatyn memorial complex, where he paid tribute to the victims. There he held a meeting with journalists, answering some questions.

“Recently, the British authorities announced their intention to supply Ukraine with depleted uranium ammunition”, – one of the Russian journalists began his question – “Please tell me…”

 “I’ll tell you!” – without waiting for the end of the question, Lukashenko began, – “and Russia will supply us with ammunition with real uranium. If they [the UK] are crazy, they will boost this.”

Such a response from the Belarusian president caused a wide reaction. In the public space, for the first time, they started talking about a new type of nuclear blackmail from Moscow, according to which nuclear weapons could soon be deployed on the territory of Belarus.

Already on March 25, a few days after the end of Xi Jinping’s visit to Moscow, the Russia 1 TV Channel aired an interview with Vladimir Putin. In it, he, among other things, touched upon the topic of Belarus:

“As for our negotiations with Lukashenko, even outside the context of these events, Alexander Lukashenko has long questioned deploying Russian tactical nuclear weapons on the territory of Belarus. First, the US has been doing this for decades. They placed it in six states of Europe. And [with Lukashenko], we agreed that we would do the same. On July 1, we are completing the construction of a special storage facility for tactical nuclear weapons on the territory of Belarus.”

Exactly two months later, on May 25, at a meeting in Minsk, the defence ministers of Belarus and Russia signed documents defining the procedure for keeping Russian “non-strategic nuclear weapons” in a particular storage facility on the territory of Belarus. On the same day, Alexander Lukashenko said that the transfer of Russian nuclear weapons to the territory of Belarus had already begun.

In this article, Ascolta analyses Belarus’ attempt to return to the “nuclear club” and create a new threat to Europe and strategic stability on the world stage. Based on data from our sources, we determine possible locations for deploying nuclear weapons on the territory of Belarus and routes for their delivery.

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On March 22, 2023, on the occasion of the 80th anniversary of the Khatyn tragedy, Alexander Lukashenko visited the renovated Khatyn memorial complex, where he paid tribute to the victims. There he held a meeting with journalists, answering some questions.

“Recently, the British authorities announced their intention to supply Ukraine with depleted uranium ammunition”, – one of the Russian journalists began his question – “Please tell me…”

 “I’ll tell you!” – without waiting for the end of the question, Lukashenko began, – “and Russia will supply us with ammunition with real uranium. If they [the UK] are crazy, they will boost this.”

Such a response from the Belarusian president caused a wide reaction. In the public space, for the first time, they started talking about a new type of nuclear blackmail from Moscow, according to which nuclear weapons could soon be deployed on the territory of Belarus.

Already on March 25, a few days after the end of Xi Jinping’s visit to Moscow, the Russia 1 TV Channel aired an interview with Vladimir Putin. In it, he, among other things, touched upon the topic of Belarus:

“As for our negotiations with Lukashenko, even outside the context of these events, Alexander Lukashenko has long questioned deploying Russian tactical nuclear weapons on the territory of Belarus. First, the US has been doing this for decades. They placed it in six states of Europe. And [with Lukashenko], we agreed that we would do the same. On July 1, we are completing the construction of a special storage facility for tactical nuclear weapons on the territory of Belarus.”

Exactly two months later, on May 25, at a meeting in Minsk, the defence ministers of Belarus and Russia signed documents defining the procedure for keeping Russian “non-strategic nuclear weapons” in a particular storage facility on the territory of Belarus. On the same day, Alexander Lukashenko said that the transfer of Russian nuclear weapons to the territory of Belarus had already begun.

In this article, Ascolta analyses Belarus’ attempt to return to the “nuclear club” and create a new threat to Europe and strategic stability on the world stage. Based on data from our sources, we determine possible locations for deploying nuclear weapons on the territory of Belarus and routes for their delivery.

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